Thursday, February 05, 2009

Martin Luther's Alarming Hatreds Documented

[Luther1546.gif]

By Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1546


[all bolded emphases are my own]


Johann Campanus
(an Anabaptist)

We ought utterly to contemn and reject Campanus, and not to esteem him worthy of an answer, for thereby he becomes more audacious and insolent. Let us despise him, so will he soonest be smothered and suppressed.

(Table-Talk, translated by William Hazlitt, London: David Bogue, 1848, pp. 283-284)

Catholics (Who Opposed Him)

I so despise those devils . . . I beg you, learn to despise men strongly, as Christ says: "Beware of men."

(Letter to Michael Maurer, 20 October 1520, in Luther's Correspondence and Other Contemporary Letters, Vol. I: 1507-1521, translated and edited by Preserved Smith, Philadelphia: The Lutheran Publication Society, 1913, p. 377)

Erasmus

Erasmus is worthy of great hatred. I warn you all to regard him as God's enemy.

(from Conversations With Luther: Selections From Recently Published Sources of the Table Talk, translated and edited by Preserved Smith and Herbert Percival Gallinger, New York: The Pilgrim Press, 1915, p. 109)

God

Though I lived as a monk without reproach, I felt that I was a sinner before God with an extremely disturbed conscience. I could not believe that he was placated by my satisfaction. I did not love, yes, I hated the righteous God who punishes sinners, and secretly, if not blasphemously, certainly murmuring greatly, I was angry with God, and said, "As if, indeed, it is not enough, that miserable sinners, eternally lost through original sin, are crushed by every kind of calamity by the law of the Decalogue, without having God add pain to pain by the gospel and also by the gospel threatening us with his righteousness and wrath!" Thus I raged with a fierce and troubled conscience.

(Preface to the Complete Edition of Luther's Latin Writings, Wittenberg, 1545; LW: 34:336-338; cited in Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings, edited by Timothy F. Lull and William R. Russell, Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2nd edition, 2005, p. 8)

Zwingli

I believe Zwingli is worthy of holy hatred, so insolently and unworthily does he deal with the holy Word of God.


(Letter to Melanchthon, 27 October 1527, in Preserved Smith and Charles Michael Jacobs, translators and editors, Luther's Correspondence and Other Contemporary Letters, Vol. II: 1521-1530, Philadelphia: The Lutheran Publication Society, 1918, 418-419)

Paranoia About Others Hating Him or His Adherents, Etc.

GENERAL

On another occasion, when his little son, Martin, was taking the breast, the doctor said: "This babe and all who belong to me are hated by the pope, hated by duke George, hated by their partisans, hated by all the devils. . . ."

(from The Life of Luther Written By Himself, edited by Jules Michelet, translated by William Hazlitt; originally published in 1846; this version published by G. Bell, 1904, p. 264; from Tischreden, 45)

I bear upon me the hate and envy of the whole world; the hate of the Emperor, of the Pope, and of all their retinue.

(Table-Talk, edited by John Aurifaber and Anthony Lauterbach, translated by Henry Bell, London: 1832, "Passages Relating to the Life and Character of Luther," p. 23)

ERASMUS

If the Lutherans had hated him as he hates them, he would, indeed, be in peril of his life at Basle.

(Letter to Wenzel Link, 7 March 1529, in Preserved Smith and Charles Michael Jacobs, translators and editors, Luther's Correspondence and Other Contemporary Letters, Vol. II: 1521-1530, Philadelphia: The Lutheran Publication Society, 1918, 469-470)

The Hatred of God (?)

. . . we love and hate immutably, but he loves and hates from an eternal and immutable nature . . . the love and hatred of God towards men is immutable and eternal; existing, not only before there was any merit or work of Free-will, but before the worlds were made; and that, all things take place in us from necessity . . .

(On the Bondage of the Will, 1525, translated by Henry Cole, London: T. Bensley, 1823, p. 240)

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